Johnson Cook

Atlanta tech investor. Entrepreneur.

Johnson Cook - Atlanta tech investor. Entrepreneur.

Your One Thing that Closes Deals

 

This may be simplistic, but hang with me.  There is only one thing that closes deals for your team: Activities.   Duh, right? But wait…

No matter what you sell, how you sell it, or who you are: there are activities that lead to closed deals.  How you measure and track these activities is up to you. But the companies that have the most predictable, controlled, and successful sales processes track activities with aggressive precision.  If you are great at inbound marketing, activities might be web site visits, trial sign-ups, engagement, usage, or shares.   If you are dialing-for-dollars and working deals to the close, activities are calls, emails, Tweets, demos, meetings, follow-ups, and check-ins.   If you’re selling enterprise deals that are giant and slow, you have meetings, proposals, meetings, contracts, meetings, and meetings.

No matter what you sell, there is some fundamental building block of a deal that you can measure. Are you measuring it?

 

 

Startup Problems

I’m not different from most entrepreneurs in that I have the patience equivalent to that of gravity.   (E.g. If something has to come down, it may as well come down right now.)   We see where we want to be and when we decide we want to be there, we are immediately uncomfortable not being there.

In Startup Life, you set out to build a company. Maybe for the first 2 weeks you are excited to “do” a startup. But for those who have been down the path before, you know what the company looks like and it does not look like a startup.

As our startup team is starting to find our groove— deals are closing, issues are happening and being fixed, recruiting is going— all of these things are making it start to look more like a company and less like a startup.

But with all that patience we talked about before, we start to immediately think about ourselves as a company… and when we do that, a funny thing happens.    All of the things that are normal checklist items for a startup to get done to become a company, all of a sudden can feel like problems.

Problems everywhere!  Our offer letter sucks, that’s a problem.   We don’t have enough MRR to do X: problem.   Our product only has 20% of the capabilities that we want it to have: problem.    Our engineering team is too small: problem.

But in reality, these aren’t problems, they are just things to do.   At the end of the day sometimes, I walk out of the Village thinking “Oh crap, we have a company with tons of problems.”  But honestly, every thing that we see is a problem, isn’t something that fell apart because we haven’t been paying attention, it’s just something that we haven’t gotten to… yet.

It is excruciatingly difficult to step back, remember the big picture, and slow down the analysis. But when you do, you’ll remember who you really are, how impressive it is what you’ve accomplished already, and how to enjoy the fact that you have so many opportunities every day to shape what will become a great organization.   Just keep moving. Each day, get something important done.

Rogue Sales Reps

 

Going Rogue. Get it?

Going Rogue. Get it?

In sales pitches with large companies, there is a common feedback that we hear at almost every meeting. It goes something like this:

“…Getting all of our customer conversations in Salesforce.com would be great… but there are some reps who just don’t like using Salesforce and they just never will….    They are doing great and they have their own way of doing things and nobody will ever tell them otherwise.”

We chuckle at this feedback.  I often wonder if the sales leaders can hear what they are saying as they say it. Maybe I’m missing something.   I agree that a rockstar producer should be given more flexibility perhaps, but making excuses about why they don’t share information about customer conversations in your CRM seems like a stretch.

In sales, (yes, even large, complex enterprise deals that take years to nurture and caress to a close) companies benefit from predictability. Process leads to predictability.   Data is needed for a process to work.  You can’t know if you’re in step 3 or step 13 without data.  And yes, everything is a process. Even the softer side of caressing C-suite executives on the golf course, over cigars, or on a private jet to shoot birds in South America (you know who you are! #jealous)… it’s all a process that is leading to the same thing. A signature that means money will find it’s way to your company and your services will add value to a customer.

Even the big deals should be tracked. Everything should be tracked! What happens if your top producer is taken out by Dick Cheney on one of these hunting trips?   Where will you find the status of the conversation with the countless contacts at the organizations they are working? Are you going to power through their years of emails and decipher who goes what and what goes where?

With the growth and expanding importance of CRM software to companies, I stand by our position that

every 

single

tiny

piece of information about customers that you can track 

should live forever in the CRM!!

Forever and ever, amen!